Extended hormone therapy doesn't help some prostate cancer - WHLT 22 Connecting the Pine Belt

Extended hormone therapy doesn't help some prostate cancer patients

Updated:
© iStockphoto.com/ Lilli Day © iStockphoto.com/ Lilli Day
  • HealthMore>>

  • Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.
    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.
  • Too few teens receive HPV shot

    Too few teens receive HPV shot

    An "unacceptably low" number of girls and boys are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical, anal and other cancers, U.S. health officials said Thursday.
    An "unacceptably low" number of girls and boys are getting the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical, anal and other cancers, U.S. health officials said Thursday.
  • Teenage boys want intimacy, not just sex

    Teenage boys want intimacy, not just sex

    The stereotype of the sex-crazed teenage boy may be dead wrong, according to a small study that asked boys what they really want from romantic relationships.
    The stereotype of the sex-crazed teenage boy may be dead wrong, according to a small study that asked boys what they really want from romantic relationships.

MONDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, long-term hormone therapy after radiation therapy provides no survival advantages compared with short-term hormone therapy, according to a new study.

Hormone therapy is used to reduce the levels of male hormones (androgens) such as testosterone, which can stimulate the growth of prostate cancer cells.

Researchers examined data from 133 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who underwent either long-term hormone therapy (59 patients) or short-term hormone therapy (74 patients) after receiving external beam radiation therapy.

Ten-year overall survival was 61 percent in the short-term group and 65 percent in the long-term group, which is not a statistically significant difference. Disease-specific survival was 96 percent in both groups.

The study was scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, in Atlanta.

"Most clinicians have felt that 'more was better' when it came to blocking testosterone in prostate cancer patients, however, results for the specific endpoints we focused on, OS [overall survival] and DSS [disease-specific survival], indicate that this was clearly not the case," study lead author Dr. Amin Mirhadi, a radiation oncologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said in a society news release.

"This data supports administering less treatment, which will result in fewer side effects and reduce patients' overall health care costs," Mirhadi added.

The data and conclusions of research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The Urology Care Foundation has more about hormone therapy for prostate cancer.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow

5912 Hwy. 49, Ste. A
Hattiesburg, MS 39401

Telephone: 601.545.2077
Fax: 601.545.3589
Email: newsroom@whlt.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.